Really Good Project
Me Too: According to...

Explores the oversimplification of 'grey areas' and navigates complexities surrounding consent: believer or non-believer?

This book looks to bring the Me Too movement out of a digital space and into the real: putting it into the form of a sacred text to bring emphasis, not only how important the words are but also how some people take these words verbatim and some dismiss them without thought. The tweets are often stories and claims made without context or evidence however often we feel we are unable to question these claims. The unwillingness to accept challenge and criticism is similar to within organised religion. I endeavour to encourage people to question and have an open and frank dialogue constantly on this ever evolving issue. --during a test using an online twitter data capture algorithm, over 4000 tweets were retrieved, posted within a two hour time limit, referencing ‘Me Too’.

It is not as simple as do you or don’t you believe... It is about shaping the moral code of our future.

The octothorpe # is a prominent symbol today and is used to share information with the world. Religious symbols are used to represent the religion so that they are recognisable but also to communicate the religions history. The octothorpe is especially important in this case as it also represents equality in the nine equal spaces. The Me Too book is a comment on how we approach the movement, how much traction (followers) it gained, how the lack of questioning and willingness to get swept up in a movement can go too far, how some people refuse to question it at all but just dismiss it regardless and how there is some element of truth to each side of a story. The book contains the positive, the negative and the downright awful reactions to people’s Me Too tweets. How some people use the movement for their own benefit, how many people have been affected in some way, and honest discourse on why it is important and why women felt men should or shouldn’t be involved in the movement.

octothorpe
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Really Good Project
Turmeric. Haldi. Halada. Indian Saffron.

Omni- celebrates turmeric’s ‘omnipresence’: the versatility of the spice, the mess involved when using it, the chaos of India and how far the spice has spread across the world. The paper is hand dyed yellow with turmeric and the fingerprints are screenprinted with turmeric.

Omni- represents turmeric spreading across continents and borders and throughout the globe. Turmeric is now in a lot of foods we eat—even if we don’t know that it is there—and stains everything it touches. It tells the story of the significance of turmeric in India and reinforces its roots —without having a generic Indian aesthetic—and reflects its many uses and historic origins via a narrative story: stories are the way culture and tradition is passed down in India and the way they evolve from family to family, region to region, much like the recipes they share, much like the way this story of turmeric is being brought to you.

The typography is simple and clean to allow the turmeric to take over and be king. Noto Sans was the original choice for all type; it was chosen for its flexibility across languages in having almost all glyphs from most languages, including Hindi, Marathi and other South Asian languages —where turmeric originates. The change to a serif for the body copy and pull quotes was based on aesthetics as Noto Sans was too clunky when paired with the bitmapped turmeric screen prints and colour halftone images; Garamond is one of the oldest fonts still used today and was used in both royal and regular typographic pieces. This parallels the historic origins of turmeric, its use today and its presence in both royalty and slums in India.

All digitally printed images are colour halftone with the colour being that of the copy it is attributed to, treating the images as texture, like type. This helps in letting the images sit back and not outshine the typography and narrative story. The images for the image inserts are rotated 270° to force the reader to read the images differently and see texture before image.

Page one is set akin to poetry to force the readers pace and give emphasis to specific words. This is a frame to the narrative throughout the book. Asterisks are used to introduce additional information and insight and to typographically link turmeric as being added in after. These elements remain in Noto Sans as they are informative rather than narrative. Pull quotes are set in italics, they represent an alternate meaning to their origin, using metaphors to tell the story of turmeric spreading through the book. Elements within the book that are purposefully written: AC 1, AC 2 (Air Conditioned First Class, Air Conditioned Second Class), written on both the train carriages and on the tickets we purchased, it was important to retain this within the narrative to keep the tone of voice consistent; !ncredible India uses an exclamation mark in replacement of the I, the government uses this as part of their marketing campaign throughout India to encourage people to travel there.

turmeric
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